4 Comments

Summary:

A lot of people had problems with pairing their Vonage accounts with the ZyXEL WiFi phone. Even Andy had some issues with it, and had a tough time configuring it. Well I am adding two images to help with the set-up. 1. Create an account with […]

A lot of people had problems with pairing their Vonage accounts with the ZyXEL WiFi phone. Even Andy had some issues with it, and had a tough time configuring it. Well I am adding two images to help with the set-up.

1. Create an account with Vonage by going to http://www.vonage.com.
2. You will need to subscribe to a soft phone #. This soft phone # will be used for configuring your P2000W phone.
3. A password will be generated for this soft phone #.
4. Enter this soft phone # and the password given to you in the SIP configuration of P2000W. The password can be found under features >> vonage softphone: manage softphone lines >>manage your vonage softphone lines>>continue. The soft phone # is the sip uri as well as the registrar username. Enter the password in the registrar password field.
5. Enter the Outbound proxy IP address and proxy port as 216.115.25.199 (sphone.vopr.vonage.net) and 5061.
vonage_sip_config.GIF

vonage_outbound_proxy.GIF

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  1. Did you just give out your 10 digit password?

  2. Nah – that is a made-up#. Even I know that sometimes it is not a good idea to put one’s number online! He he :-)

  3. Andy Abramson Monday, July 26, 2004

    Om,

    So everyone who reads you (and me) the issue was not getting the Vonage account set up. It was pulling a DHCP set up.

    Seems the problem is related to chipsets and the lack of compatability. I *THINK* and am awaiting a call from Zyxel’s lead in support that the issue is how it deals with MIXED 802.11b/g signals with the Microsoft wireless gateway.

    Andy

  4. Charlie Sierra Monday, July 26, 2004

    Andy,

    I’m wondering if you ever saw the piece over at Tom’s Hardware (maybe 2 months ago?) which specifically reviewed tons on 802.11 equipment and found that much of the equipment fails to work as advertised, ie at the “so-called” standard rates.

    Mostly when the devices worked, they often were only operating at 1 or 2Mbps, not 11 or 55, etc.

    Lastly, since wireless, just like ethernet, is a “shared” resource, this means that all it takes is one crappy device to downgrade the experience of everybody.

    PS. I’m so ready for UWB!!!
    More bandwidth, less power!!!

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