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Summary:

We have all been abused by the spammers, have cursed them, called them names and have hoped that our government is going to do something about it. Spam regulation is marginal at best. Washington hasn’t really done anything. And the reason for its reticence – well […]

We have all been abused by the spammers, have cursed them, called them names and have hoped that our government is going to do something about it. Spam regulation is marginal at best. Washington hasn’t really done anything. And the reason for its reticence – well good old politics. According to spam-protection firm, MailFrontier, more than 1.25 billion political emails will reach the inboxes of registered voters through the 2004 national election cycle. Based on early findings by MailFrontier Research, this year’s national election cycle will mark an unprecedented level of political email spam received by registered voters. Political email spam – email sent from or on behalf of a candidate for public office – is differentiated from the legal requirements of commercial email spam under CAN-SPAM. This legitimate political email spam will reach new heights this election cycle as the Internet plays a particularly historic role as a direct and interactive communication vehicle with voters.

  1. Charlie Sierra Wednesday, July 14, 2004

    What about texting?

    The Politicos always exempt themselves from regulation, its a seperation of powers deal, if I can recall.

    Also lets not forget that these bozos have to right to call you home phone even if you are on a ‘don’t call’ list.

    A cellphone is the only place of refuge… well until the CTIA finalizes its plan to sell your phone number to 3rd parties.

    The world is going to hell, wake me up when the forecast changes.

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