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VOIP Watch: In his post, prompted by a long chat with some reporter from a major publication, Andy writes – They are not only breaking stories, they are each providing outstanding content about the spaces they cover from a truely journalist first, fair is fair, and […]

VOIP Watch: In his post, prompted by a long chat with some reporter from a major publication, Andy writes -

They are not only breaking stories, they are each providing outstanding content about the spaces they cover from a truely journalist first, fair is fair, and facts may mess up their story, but they report accurately and provide well written commentary. In a word, they are today’s Press.

He was talking about folks like me and Rafat Ali. In grand tradition of blogging lovefests, I would like to thank Andy for including me in this long post, and to that I say – Andy I have become quite a fan of your blog. You are doing yeoman’s work with it. I would like to add my two cents if you folks indulge me.I have a day job at Business 2.0 which keeps in Trussardis and Grey Goose. I love writing for a monthly magazine, for it allows me to indulge in careful analysis and long musing sessions at the neighborhood coffee bar.

I personally see my blog as a way to extend my brand, and a way to build a community around my writings. It is a way to let readers know that my involvement with a story does not end the minute magazine goes to press. I normally don’t only write a story I am passionate about, whether it is exposing a scandal or simply loving a new piece of software. Those who are gracious enough to read my blog, I think get a sense of this. Its almost like I am thinking out loud. In short, there is method to this madness – whether it is original posts, or simply links. These are bits rattling in this giant empty drum I call my head.

A lot of my peers perhaps don’t understand the importance of the feedback loop. When Charlie Sierra tells me something, I go chase it and think about it and if convinced, write about it. In short, my readers become part of the story/thought process. And that is invaluable. Writing an article for the magazine is like giving a speech – long, mostly lonely and scary process. Blogging, however is like going to neighborhood pub, and having a heated and lively discussion with pals who have similar interests.

Anyway I think I have rambled on too long for this post – got to go back to feature writing.

  1. Om,

    It’s going to be interesting observing how blogging impacts traditional media…..as Andy states, bloggers are “today’s Press”.

    Since bundling content was how the media giants became so powerful…..it stands to reason that disintermediation of content should be a considerable threat (to them)…….and provide considerable opportunity for those who can harness this trend.

    - Bill

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  2. I hope you meant “not passionate about” in this sentence. — “I normally donít write a story I am passionate about, whether it is exposing a scandal or simply loving a new piece of software.” — damn those double negatives :-)

    I just ‘discovered’ your blog the other day and was immediately hooked. Good job.

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  3. Michael – thanks for catching this – sometimes i just type too damn fast for my own good. ahhhhh! thanks again

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  4. glad to help. It happens to the best of us

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  5. VOIP is the future thats why all these telco. companies are rushing to grab that frontier before anyone else does, guess only the future will tell us about which direction VOIP is directed.

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