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Summary:

With biometric fingerprint sensors becoming more commonplace than ever the security of this technology has been touted as unbeatable and very reliable. Enter Tsutomu Matsumoto, a Japanese cryptographer, who has demonstrated how easily fooled these sensors can be. Using gelatine, a common ingredient in Gummi bears […]

With biometric fingerprint sensors becoming more commonplace than ever the security of this technology has been touted as unbeatable and very reliable. Enter Tsutomu Matsumoto, a Japanese cryptographer, who has demonstrated how easily fooled these sensors can be.

Using gelatine, a common ingredient in Gummi bears and other candy, Mr. Matsumoto created a fake finger mold out of plastic which he used to fool fingerprint sensors four out of five times. Using readily available components he found he could reliably fool eleven commercially available fingerprint biometric systems.”The results are enough to scrap the systems completely, and to send the various fingerprint biometric companies packing,” said Schneier in yesterday’s edition of his Crypto-Gram newsletter, which first publicised the issue. ®Thanks to The Register for this story.

  1. Kinda sounds like Sony’s revolutionary cd anti-piracy system that can be bypassed with a black marker pen ;-)

  2. Yeah. I’ve always wondered what all the buzz about fingerprint sensors was all about. And for me including it on the iPAQ 5500 just seemed silly. But, the good news is if you need to borrow your buddy’s iPAQ you can just use some Gummi bears to let you in.

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