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Summary:

* Michael Powell shakes his fist: I think it’s going to turn (the telephone industry) on its head and remake itself into something that consumers are going to find enormously valuable. I think it’s going to be the very, very best and biggest breakthrough in our […]

* Michael Powell shakes his fist: I think it’s going to turn (the telephone industry) on its head and remake itself into something that consumers are going to find enormously valuable. I think it’s going to be the very, very best and biggest breakthrough in our ambitions and dreams about competition ever. If you’re a big incumbent and you’ve sort of enjoyed a competitive advantage . . . you, in my opinion, ought to be terrified

* VoIP to Boom in Residential Market: A new study says residential use of Voice-over-Internet Protocol telephony will see “explosive growth” over the next three years in North America. Research firm Frost & Sullivan says explosive growth in the North American residential voice-over-IP (VOIP) market during the the next three years will be accompanied by a 77-fold increase in sales of “endpoints” — that is, analog telephone adapters (ATAs), VOIP residential gateways, IP phones, and session initiation protocol (SIP) phones.

* VoIP a Security risk?: IP telephony, or voice over IP, poses significant security problems that are challenges at the moment but will become easier eventually, security experts at the National Institute of Standards and Technology say in a draft report released this month. The authors, Richard Kuhn, Thomas Walsh and Steffen Fries, warn that attempting to integrate VoIP into an already congested data network “could be disastrous for an organization’s technology infrastructure.”

* Nextel strikes back: Things got anasty between Nextel, the FCC, and CTIA. Yesterday Nextel CEO Tim Donahue gave the finger to the other two. He had sent a letter to FCC Chairman Michael Powell stating that while the company is committed to solving the public safety interference problem, his responsibility is to Nextel shareholders and that the company “cannot and will not” accept 2.1GHz replacement spectrum in lieu of 1.9GHz.  2.1GHz spectrum had been suggested as a middle-ground by CTIA last week. It will be curious to see how the FCC responds to this letter.  It obviously does not want to be portrayed as being bullied into giving in to either Nextel or CTIA/Verizon Wireless.

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