Summary:

Wired editor Chris Anderson is turning his reporter eye on the trends driving the broadband home of the future, and the market opportunities it is creating. His reasons include: bq. The first is the rise of digital media. What started with the audio CD has suddenly […]

Wired editor Chris Anderson is turning his reporter eye on the trends driving the broadband home of the future, and the market opportunities it is creating. His reasons include:

bq. The first is the rise of digital media. What started with the audio CD has suddenly become a clean sweep: DVD players now outsell VHS players, digital camcorders outsell analog versions, digital cameras outsell film cameras, and both digital cable and digital TV are poised to pass their analog counterparts in the next few years. Except for radio (Sirius or XM users notwithstanding), odds are increasing that the entertainment media you consume is 100 percent digital.

I agree with this fine point about Broadband, Anderson makes:

bq. Finally, broadband has reached critical mass in the home. With a high-speed, always-on connection came a fundamental change in the way people listen to music, play games, and watch the news.

Of course, I am assuming for most practical purposes, he is talking about cable-based broadband, because if you are one of those people who are stuck in DSL hell, Broadband Nirvana is many years off.

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