Summary:

Clearly going after Sprint, AT&T Wireless will give you a free Sony Ericsson GC82 wireless laptop card (for connecting to AT&T’s new high-speed EDGE cellular network, reports Gizmodo. That is a clear sign that mobile carriers have finally figured out that wireless wide area networks are […]

Clearly going after Sprint, AT&T Wireless will give you a free Sony Ericsson GC82 wireless laptop card (for connecting to AT&T’s new high-speed EDGE cellular network, reports Gizmodo. That is a clear sign that mobile carriers have finally figured out that wireless wide area networks are one way to goose up their average revenue per user. With eat as much as you can data plans costing around $80 a month, mobile carriers get more money from this service than just voice service that brings in around $55 a month per user. Driven by this push, Allied Business Intelligence is predicting a boom in the cellular PC card (CPC) business.

bq. Although many players have tried and failed in this business, success rests with those who have strong relationships with both operators and IT product distributors. The industry currently stands at a high growth potential, with numerous high-speed 3G network launches planned across the globe in the next few years, forecasts technology research firm ABI.

bq. “With the right target audience, CPC modems give operators immediate access to a pool of enterprise users who would like to capitalize on high-speed networks. This is an interesting twist compared to earlier adopters of 3G, where operators like NTT DoCoMo and Hutchison 3 focused on individual users,” comments ABI analyst Kenil Vora.  “CPC users tend to bring in a higher and sustained ARPU, unlike the pattern with individual users that tends to be cyclical.”

ABI expects substantial rise in volumes of CPC modems with the continued deployment of 3G networks across the globe. Over time, ABI expects GSM-family devices to comprise a much larger share of CPC modems shipments as 3G networks in Europe and Asia launch.  ABI estimates about two-thirds of the modems shipped today are based on CDMA technology, with this mix shifting radically towards GPRS/EDGE/UMTS shipments as these networks launch.

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