Summary:

(In case you hadn’t noticed, I am doing blanket coverage of the BBC Online controversy, on two fronts: one is the review of BBC’s online spe…

(In case you hadn’t noticed, I am doing blanket coverage of the BBC Online controversy, on two fronts: one is the review of BBC’s online spend, and other is the move to digitize all its archives and make it available online…you can read more about the controversies in the dedicated company page)

Meanwhile, on the digitization project: “It’s much more an experiment in morals than in technology. The one unshakable tenet of the anti-file-sharing campaigners is that piracy is theft, and theft is wrong. Who’d argue with that? The BBC can contemplate giving away the store because it’s bought and paid for its contents, and it sees its job as distributing them as widely as possible. But that conflicts with the creators’ desires to get paid commensurate with the success of their creations, and here the BBC has often disagreed with those who do the creating.”

“There are many decisions yet to make about the Creative Archive, and at each step it could go nastily and expensively wrong. But the BBC is positioning itself at the forefront of free information: we’ll find out whether that brave new world we’ve promised ourselves will actually work.”

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