Summary:

The New York Times :: It is too soon to describe the Bose family as an audio-world version of the Bush and Kennedy clans in politics, but they are off to a good start. In 1964, Amar Bose, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, […]

The New York Times :: It is too soon to describe the Bose family as an audio-world version of the Bush and Kennedy clans in politics, but they are off to a good start. In 1964, Amar Bose, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and inventor, created the renowned high-fidelity sound systems company that bears the family name. Now, his only son, Vanu, is gaining recognition for radio-design technology every bit as novel as the sound systems that his father pioneered. The younger Bose’s four-year old company, Vanu Inc., is a prominent innovator in the effort to use software rather than hardware to control how radios, cellphones and all other wireless communications devices recognize and manage signals. Early versions of the technology, known as software-defined radio, are beginning to be deployed in military communications equipment and cellular base stations.

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