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The Windows Phone app store is a lot better than when it launched, but that just makes its app holes more glaring — like Uber, which used to have an app (really a website in an app wrapper) until it pulled it from the platform last April. Well, good news for Windows Phone users who love on-demand car services: you can now download an official Uber app, as opposed to using the service’s mobile website. Like my colleague Kevin Tofel and his need for a decent Google+ client, I’m sure there are people whose last hurdle to adopting Microsoft’s mobile OS was the lack of a decent Uber app.

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Sprint and Google already have a history of close cooperation on consumer apps — Sprint was the only major U.S. carrier to support Google Wallet — but now it looks like they’re making their partnership more professional. In August, Sprint will start offering Google apps to small business and enterprise customers. The carrier won’t just resell access to Gmail, Calendar, Drive and Docs business accounts; it will provide customer support, giving those businesses a single point of contact for their mobile network and device problems as well as their app issues.

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In Brief

chromebook with kids
photo: Google

My $1,449 Chromebook Pixel just got a little more useful and so did the $299 Acer Chromebook C720P. The latest Stable channel software update adds support for pinch-to-zoom in Chrome OS. That means any touchscreen Chromebook now has the feature. Previously, pinch-to-zoom was available on developer and beta channels, but the user had to enable the feature in a hidden setting. Now, it’s on by default and makes the overall browsing experience a little better. This function, along with the recent addition of handwriting recognition could make for a nice Chrome OS tablet, particularly if it came with a docking keyboard, no?

In Brief

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Not that we needed yet another data-point explaining why China is such an important mobile market or anything but Reuters is happy to provide one. On Monday, it reported that for the first time ever, more people in China access the web on a mobile device as opposed to a PC. The data comes from the China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC) and says that of the 632 million internet users in China, 83 percent (527 million) used a phone or tablet to do so. That compares with 81 percent of the connected population accessing the web through a PC, with some overlap between the two of course.

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